Should There Be Christian Mentalists?

 

"Were You Thinking of the Four of Clubs?"

Here's a Palm Sunday Joke:

A little boy is sick and can't go to church on Palm Sunday. His parents and siblings come home with palm leafs.

"What are the palms for?" the little boy asked. "These are what the people used to wave over Jesus when he came."

The little boy looked disappointed and said, "Boy, that stinks; the one day I don't go to church, Jesus comes."

That joke has nothing to do with this article. In fact, this article — unlike most of the articles on this website — poses a serious question for which we have no answer.

So, here's the question we have to ask: should an Irish Catholic or any Christian, Jew or Muslim perform mentalism?

 

 

We have written prior essays about whether a Christian can perform magic and came out with the answer that "yes, a Christian can perform magic without offending his or her faith."

 

 

But now, as we think about our act, we wonder if we should claim special powers.  To set the record straight on two issues: first we don't claim special powers in any show; second, we have no special powers.  In fact, we can barely perform a double lift.

 

But in Tom Hardy act, we claim to be able to read peoples' minds, predict what they will say or the card they will select, or move objects with the mental powers.

 

 

This is not a Christian Magic Act. It is at best a comedy mentalism act performed by a struggling and fallen Christian.

 


 

"Were You Thinking of the Four of Clubs?"

Here's a Palm Sunday Joke:

A little boy is sick and can't go to church on Palm Sunday. His parents and siblings come home with palm leafs.

"What are the palms for?" the little boy asked. "These are what the people used to wave over Jesus when he came."

The little boy looked disappointed and said, "Boy, that stinks; the one day I don't go to church, Jesus comes."

That joke has nothing to do with this article. In fact, this article — unlike most of the articles on this website — poses a serious question for which we have no answer.

So, here's the question we have to ask: should an Irish Catholic or any Christian, Jew or Muslim perform mentalism?

 

 

We have written prior essays about whether a Christian can perform magic and came out with the answer that "yes, a Christian can perform magic without offending his or her faith."

 

 

But now, as we think about our act, we wonder if we should claim special powers.  To set the record straight on two issues: first we don't claim special powers in any show; second, we have no special powers.  In fact, we can barely perform a double lift.

 

But in Tom Hardy act, we claim to be able to read peoples' minds, predict what they will say or the card they will select, or move objects with the mental powers.

 

 

This is not a Christian Magic Act. It is at best a comedy mentalism act performed by a struggling and fallen Christian.

 

We don’t feel pure enough to use the act to evangelize in any manner but wondered while practicing  "Twisted Sisters" whether it is appropriate to perform a religious mentalism act.

 

 

We don't know of any pure religious mentalism acts out there.

 

If you know of one, please fill us in.

 

Our routine is premised on "experiments" that were taught by Li'l Tom Hardy, America's Foremost Psychic Entertainer.

 

We explain these experiments are only evidence that how someone who is perceptive can influence volunteers' choices or detect what the volunteers are thinking.

 

 

So, could this act be used effectively as an evangelization tool — what would or could we say?

 

 

This isn't a lampoon. We're on the level.

 

In non-mentalism acts, a magician can use everything from a Blendo to torn-and-restored newspaper to make an object lesson. But in the case of mentalism, what would you say?

 

"In the same way I influenced you to select the four of clubs, the world can influence you to make wrong choices."

 

"I am not a mind-reader but I play one on TV. But your thoughts are not only important here on the stage but also important in life. Thoughts, prayers, concerns and worries, feelings of joy or thankfulness, can be shared without speaking a word, with God."

 

But really, should mentalism be mixed with religion?

 

We know there are mentalists who warn against the deception of those claiming special powers such as psychics and mediums.  But can mentalism be used by itself as an effect in a church show?

 

 

We don't have any answers. Let us know what you think.

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