Mandrake the Magician

Hypnotist Teaches Marines

martini_glassDC Military news service had a great story about a great use
for our skills.

Master Sgt. Bryan McDaniel (Retired) served in the Marine
Corps for 23 years before retiring in 2003. 

He told reporters he attended many Safety Standdown
presentations in his time but recalled very few of them. 

<b>"I understand the intent of them, but most of
them appeared to be a 'check-in-the-box'' said the Akron, Ohio
native. "I developed this presentation so the Marines can enjoy themselves
but also get a powerful message."</b>

Mr. McDaniel's skills as a magician and hypnotist combined
with experience as a Marine leave his audience with a message they will not
likely forget.

The statistics are daunting:

According to the Washington Regional Alcohol
Program's review How Safe Are Our Roads, after a half-decade of steadily
increasing alcohol-related traffic fatalities in the United States, the number
of drunk driving deaths in the region decreased by nearly ten percent in 2004,
yet the percentage of alcohol-related fatalities is still at 45.5%.

Two out of 10 of those fatalities were people under the age
of 21.

These statistics are staggering by any standard, yet many
people still choose to ignore them and the laws which were meant to protect
citizens or, at the very least, minimize fatalities, accidents and injuries.

The magician helped 17 volunteers get ready and in the
suggestive mood. He asked the Marines to "imagine they were in a very cold
environment with only shorts and a t-shirt.

Within seconds, they were shivering, and rubbing their arms
to keep warm. Afterward, while still in a trance, they were told they were in Death Valley, Calif.,
and the temperature outside was 120 F. Some wiped their brow, while others gasped
for air."

Mr. McDaniels took the subjects to the horse races (they
lost money), to trick-n-treat (they got yummy candy), and to dance like the
Village People (yikes).

These amusements were prologue to the true message of the
evening. 

The Marines were directed to imagine they were at a party
getting drunk.

Four of the Marines shot down about three drinks each and
agreed they were "intoxicated."  The
volunteers had to decide who was going to drive them home.

"I'll drive!!" said Sgt. Orville Williams,
in slurred speech. "I'm the designated driver!!"

He proceeded to
stumble to his makeshift car, and sat behind the wheel. The other volunteers
followed suit. The driver, nor the passengers, wore their seatbelts.

After driving a short period, Williams slammed his brakes to
avoid an obstruction on the road. He lost control of his vehicle, crashing it,
and ultimately killing his 4 comrades. He sobbed, stating his sadness.

"I never meant to take the wheel," said Williams.
"I didn't mean to kill my fellow Marines!"

The volunteers on stage were moved by their involvement, and
their emotion drove the point home for the vast audience.

"You need to make the right decisions before you go
drinking," the magician said.

Magic Magic News Magic Secrets

martini_glassDC Military news service had a great story about a great use
for our skills.

Master Sgt. Bryan McDaniel (Retired) served in the Marine
Corps for 23 years before retiring in 2003. 

He told reporters he attended many Safety Standdown
presentations in his time but recalled very few of them. 

<b>"I understand the intent of them, but most of
them appeared to be a 'check-in-the-box'' said the Akron, Ohio
native. "I developed this presentation so the Marines can enjoy themselves
but also get a powerful message."</b>

Mr. McDaniel's skills as a magician and hypnotist combined
with experience as a Marine leave his audience with a message they will not
likely forget.

The statistics are daunting:

According to the Washington Regional Alcohol
Program's review How Safe Are Our Roads, after a half-decade of steadily
increasing alcohol-related traffic fatalities in the United States, the number
of drunk driving deaths in the region decreased by nearly ten percent in 2004,
yet the percentage of alcohol-related fatalities is still at 45.5%.

Two out of 10 of those fatalities were people under the age
of 21.

These statistics are staggering by any standard, yet many
people still choose to ignore them and the laws which were meant to protect
citizens or, at the very least, minimize fatalities, accidents and injuries.

The magician helped 17 volunteers get ready and in the
suggestive mood. He asked the Marines to "imagine they were in a very cold
environment with only shorts and a t-shirt.

Within seconds, they were shivering, and rubbing their arms
to keep warm. Afterward, while still in a trance, they were told they were in Death Valley, Calif.,
and the temperature outside was 120 F. Some wiped their brow, while others gasped
for air."

Mr. McDaniels took the subjects to the horse races (they
lost money), to trick-n-treat (they got yummy candy), and to dance like the
Village People (yikes).

These amusements were prologue to the true message of the
evening. 

The Marines were directed to imagine they were at a party
getting drunk.

Four of the Marines shot down about three drinks each and
agreed they were "intoxicated."  The
volunteers had to decide who was going to drive them home.

"I'll drive!!" said Sgt. Orville Williams,
in slurred speech. "I'm the designated driver!!"

He proceeded to
stumble to his makeshift car, and sat behind the wheel. The other volunteers
followed suit. The driver, nor the passengers, wore their seatbelts.

After driving a short period, Williams slammed his brakes to
avoid an obstruction on the road. He lost control of his vehicle, crashing it,
and ultimately killing his 4 comrades. He sobbed, stating his sadness.

"I never meant to take the wheel," said Williams.
"I didn't mean to kill my fellow Marines!"

The volunteers on stage were moved by their involvement, and
their emotion drove the point home for the vast audience.

"You need to make the right decisions before you go
drinking," the magician said.

Magic Magic News Magic Secrets

Hypnotist Teaches Marines

martini_glassDC Military news service had a great story about a great use
for our skills.

Master Sgt. Bryan McDaniel (Retired) served in the Marine
Corps for 23 years before retiring in 2003. 

He told reporters he attended many Safety Standdown
presentations in his time but recalled very few of them. 

<b>"I understand the intent of them, but most of
them appeared to be a 'check-in-the-box'' said the Akron, Ohio
native. "I developed this presentation so the Marines can enjoy themselves
but also get a powerful message."</b>

Mr. McDaniel's skills as a magician and hypnotist combined
with experience as a Marine leave his audience with a message they will not
likely forget.

The statistics are daunting:

According to the Washington Regional Alcohol
Program's review How Safe Are Our Roads, after a half-decade of steadily
increasing alcohol-related traffic fatalities in the United States, the number
of drunk driving deaths in the region decreased by nearly ten percent in 2004,
yet the percentage of alcohol-related fatalities is still at 45.5%.

Two out of 10 of those fatalities were people under the age
of 21.

These statistics are staggering by any standard, yet many
people still choose to ignore them and the laws which were meant to protect
citizens or, at the very least, minimize fatalities, accidents and injuries.

The magician helped 17 volunteers get ready and in the
suggestive mood. He asked the Marines to "imagine they were in a very cold
environment with only shorts and a t-shirt.

Within seconds, they were shivering, and rubbing their arms
to keep warm. Afterward, while still in a trance, they were told they were in Death Valley, Calif.,
and the temperature outside was 120 F. Some wiped their brow, while others gasped
for air."

Mr. McDaniels took the subjects to the horse races (they
lost money), to trick-n-treat (they got yummy candy), and to dance like the
Village People (yikes).

These amusements were prologue to the true message of the
evening. 

The Marines were directed to imagine they were at a party
getting drunk.

Four of the Marines shot down about three drinks each and
agreed they were "intoxicated."  The
volunteers had to decide who was going to drive them home.

"I'll drive!!" said Sgt. Orville Williams,
in slurred speech. "I'm the designated driver!!"

He proceeded to
stumble to his makeshift car, and sat behind the wheel. The other volunteers
followed suit. The driver, nor the passengers, wore their seatbelts.

After driving a short period, Williams slammed his brakes to
avoid an obstruction on the road. He lost control of his vehicle, crashing it,
and ultimately killing his 4 comrades. He sobbed, stating his sadness.

"I never meant to take the wheel," said Williams.
"I didn't mean to kill my fellow Marines!"

The volunteers on stage were moved by their involvement, and
their emotion drove the point home for the vast audience.

"You need to make the right decisions before you go
drinking," the magician said.

Magic Magic News Magic Secrets

martini_glassDC Military news service had a great story about a great use
for our skills.

Master Sgt. Bryan McDaniel (Retired) served in the Marine
Corps for 23 years before retiring in 2003. 

He told reporters he attended many Safety Standdown
presentations in his time but recalled very few of them. 

<b>"I understand the intent of them, but most of
them appeared to be a 'check-in-the-box'' said the Akron, Ohio
native. "I developed this presentation so the Marines can enjoy themselves
but also get a powerful message."</b>

Mr. McDaniel's skills as a magician and hypnotist combined
with experience as a Marine leave his audience with a message they will not
likely forget.

The statistics are daunting:

According to the Washington Regional Alcohol
Program's review How Safe Are Our Roads, after a half-decade of steadily
increasing alcohol-related traffic fatalities in the United States, the number
of drunk driving deaths in the region decreased by nearly ten percent in 2004,
yet the percentage of alcohol-related fatalities is still at 45.5%.

Two out of 10 of those fatalities were people under the age
of 21.

These statistics are staggering by any standard, yet many
people still choose to ignore them and the laws which were meant to protect
citizens or, at the very least, minimize fatalities, accidents and injuries.

The magician helped 17 volunteers get ready and in the
suggestive mood. He asked the Marines to "imagine they were in a very cold
environment with only shorts and a t-shirt.

Within seconds, they were shivering, and rubbing their arms
to keep warm. Afterward, while still in a trance, they were told they were in Death Valley, Calif.,
and the temperature outside was 120 F. Some wiped their brow, while others gasped
for air."

Mr. McDaniels took the subjects to the horse races (they
lost money), to trick-n-treat (they got yummy candy), and to dance like the
Village People (yikes).

These amusements were prologue to the true message of the
evening. 

The Marines were directed to imagine they were at a party
getting drunk.

Four of the Marines shot down about three drinks each and
agreed they were "intoxicated."  The
volunteers had to decide who was going to drive them home.

"I'll drive!!" said Sgt. Orville Williams,
in slurred speech. "I'm the designated driver!!"

He proceeded to
stumble to his makeshift car, and sat behind the wheel. The other volunteers
followed suit. The driver, nor the passengers, wore their seatbelts.

After driving a short period, Williams slammed his brakes to
avoid an obstruction on the road. He lost control of his vehicle, crashing it,
and ultimately killing his 4 comrades. He sobbed, stating his sadness.

"I never meant to take the wheel," said Williams.
"I didn't mean to kill my fellow Marines!"

The volunteers on stage were moved by their involvement, and
their emotion drove the point home for the vast audience.

"You need to make the right decisions before you go
drinking," the magician said.

Magic Magic News Magic Secrets