Frank Thurston – Fair Magician But in a Good Sense

frank-thurston
What would you think of a brilliant, personable young man
who decided to give up a college scholarship to "play for a living"?

That is a rhetorical question so we hope you didn't actually
answer aloud or try to write an answer on the computer screen.  We were just using it as a clever tease or
device, if you will, to introduce a story from this morning's Tri-Valley
Herald
featuring Frank Thurston.

Mr. Thurston is the person we described in our rhetorical
question. 

He has the classic magician name — "Thurston,"
not "Frank" – and a real love for our art.

Mr. Thurston has performed his special brand of comedy magic
for 22 years and returns to the Alameda County Fair after a three-year break.

His folks and friends should not have been surprised at his
decision to pursue magic as a vocation. 
He was practically born into the business.  His uncle owned a magic store in Bakersfield, California.

"Every time I visited my grandmother, Id give her a
kiss on the cheek and just go straight to the shop, he said. Performing magic
has always been a hobby of mine."

After his study of the library's magic books, he entered his
high school's talent contest.  We don't
know whether the judges awarded him first place – see our commentary on the
grave injustice suffered by all magicians in talent show formats here – but the
chance to take the stage and perform his magic hooked him.

In a path familiar to all magicians, he began performing
shows at the library and birthday parties. 
He was becoming more than just intrigued with our art; he was neigh a
magic addict.

Mr. Thurston became the "King of the Birthday Party
Circuit in Bakersfield."

As in all addiction stories told around the table at any
12-Step meeting, magic eventually affected his decision-making and even his
life-time goals. (See below for common signs of Magic Addiction).

Mr. Thurston received a full scholarship to California State University's
Theatrical Arts program. 

His passion for magic edged out the time he had for
study.  "I decided to give up my
scholarship, and my parents thought I was nuts, he said. But it has worked out
very well."

Mr. Thurston's story did work out well.  While he no doubt suffers the same maladies
of most magic addicts, he has managed to channel the addiction in a positive
way.

He's moved from birthday parties to school assemblies, to
business events and eventually a gig at The Magic Castle. 

Mr. Thurston became a favorite of talent booking agents for
fairs after filling in for a friend in Stockton,
California almost two decades
ago.  An agency saw his work and signed
him for work at fairs on the West Coast.

He loves what he does and perhaps more importantly, the
audiences love to watch him perform.

"I basically get paid to play for a living, he said.
But it's a good job to make people happy."

Check out Mr. Thurston's web site here.

frank-thurston
What would you think of a brilliant, personable young man
who decided to give up a college scholarship to "play for a living"?

That is a rhetorical question so we hope you didn't actually
answer aloud or try to write an answer on the computer screen.  We were just using it as a clever tease or
device, if you will, to introduce a story from this morning's Tri-Valley
Herald
featuring Frank Thurston.

Mr. Thurston is the person we described in our rhetorical
question. 

He has the classic magician name — "Thurston,"
not "Frank" – and a real love for our art.

Mr. Thurston has performed his special brand of comedy magic
for 22 years and returns to the Alameda County Fair after a three-year break.

His folks and friends should not have been surprised at his
decision to pursue magic as a vocation. 
He was practically born into the business.  His uncle owned a magic store in Bakersfield, California.

"Every time I visited my grandmother, Id give her a
kiss on the cheek and just go straight to the shop, he said. Performing magic
has always been a hobby of mine."

After his study of the library's magic books, he entered his
high school's talent contest.  We don't
know whether the judges awarded him first place – see our commentary on the
grave injustice suffered by all magicians in talent show formats here – but the
chance to take the stage and perform his magic hooked him.

In a path familiar to all magicians, he began performing
shows at the library and birthday parties. 
He was becoming more than just intrigued with our art; he was neigh a
magic addict.

Mr. Thurston became the "King of the Birthday Party
Circuit in Bakersfield."

As in all addiction stories told around the table at any
12-Step meeting, magic eventually affected his decision-making and even his
life-time goals. (See below for common signs of Magic Addiction).

Mr. Thurston received a full scholarship to California State University's
Theatrical Arts program. 

His passion for magic edged out the time he had for
study.  "I decided to give up my
scholarship, and my parents thought I was nuts, he said. But it has worked out
very well."

Mr. Thurston's story did work out well.  While he no doubt suffers the same maladies
of most magic addicts, he has managed to channel the addiction in a positive
way.

He's moved from birthday parties to school assemblies, to
business events and eventually a gig at The Magic Castle. 

Mr. Thurston became a favorite of talent booking agents for
fairs after filling in for a friend in Stockton,
California almost two decades
ago.  An agency saw his work and signed
him for work at fairs on the West Coast.

He loves what he does and perhaps more importantly, the
audiences love to watch him perform.

"I basically get paid to play for a living, he said.
But it's a good job to make people happy."

Check out Mr. Thurston's web site here.

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