No Joke: Do the David Blaine Diet

Magic News for Women About to Eat a Big Burger - Don't!The Belfast Telegraph reports on a new interest in a natural weight-loss method made fashionable by animals and David Blaine.

There are those who are looking for a way to finally cut themselves free of extra fat once and for all. 

They've tried all the fad diets including Slim-Fast, Fen-Phen, chronic and wasting illness, and even the new leach natural method of liposuction.  (See our article on the genetically mutated leaches being used to suck out fat and not (much) blood). 

"But," asks the Telegraph, "have they tried just not eating?"

"Will it work?" you ask not rhetorically.

"Yes," The Telegraph Responds with an irritated tone manifested by a lack of nutrition since breakfast; evidenced as well by its stinky breath.

"How do you know?" you ask impertinently.

"Cuz," the paper says:

That fasting works for weight loss isn't in doubt. In his 44 days in
a suspended glass box, the magician David Blaine lost 24.5kg (54lb),
about 25 per cent of his original body-weight. Fasting to such an
extreme is unlikely to appeal to many, but research is showing that
partial fasting – intermittent fasting or long-term calorie restriction
diets – can have significant effects on weight and on many aspects of
health, from asthma to heart disease.

It's claimed that the benefits go far beyond those achieved by
simple weight loss, and that hunger and food deprivation somehow
trigger a mechanism that puts the body into a survival mode.

In these restrictive diets, daily consumption is cut by between 20
and 50 per cent of normal, or no food is eaten on certain days. Partial
fasting, with little eaten every other day, which has also been
investigated, is designed to trigger the same kind of survival
reactions as full fasting.

Evidence has built up since the 1930s that rodents, fish, fruit
flies, worms, yeast and monkeys all benefit from fasting. "It is well
established that, by reducing the number of calories required for
weight maintenance to 60 to 70 per cent of normal, lifespan is
increased up to 40 per cent, with near-perfect health across a broad
range of species,'' says Dr James Johnson of Louisiana State University.

So there you have it. You can lose weight in a very natural way; following the lead of rodents, fish, worms, monkeys, and David Blaine.

Of course this doesn't mean you should do whatever the animals or Mr. Blaine do.

Rodents eat their young (when not fasting, apparently); fish can't close their eyes; worms split in half and regenerate when they're not eating dirt (and doesn't it make fasting easier when the alternative is dirt?); monkeys fling their waste at folks who travel far to see them in their natural-looking cages; and Mr. Blaine didn't really fast.


Magic News for Women About to Eat a Big Burger - Don't!The Belfast Telegraph reports on a new interest in a natural weight-loss method made fashionable by animals and David Blaine.

There are those who are looking for a way to finally cut themselves free of extra fat once and for all. 

They've tried all the fad diets including Slim-Fast, Fen-Phen, chronic
and wasting illness, and even the new leach natural method of
liposuction.  (See our article on the genetically mutated leaches being used to suck out fat and not (much) blood). 

"But," asks the Telegraph, "have they tried just not eating?"

"Will it work?" you ask not rhetorically.

"Yes," The Telegraph Responds with an irritated tone manifested by a
lack of nutrition since breakfast; evidenced as well by its stinky
breath.

"How do you know?" you ask impertinently.

"Cuz," the paper says:

That fasting works for weight loss isn't in doubt. In his 44 days in
a suspended glass box, the magician David Blaine lost 24.5kg (54lb),
about 25 per cent of his original body-weight. Fasting to such an
extreme is unlikely to appeal to many, but research is showing that
partial fasting – intermittent fasting or long-term calorie restriction
diets – can have significant effects on weight and on many aspects of
health, from asthma to heart disease.

It's claimed that the benefits go far beyond those achieved by
simple weight loss, and that hunger and food deprivation somehow
trigger a mechanism that puts the body into a survival mode.

In these restrictive diets, daily consumption is cut by between 20
and 50 per cent of normal, or no food is eaten on certain days. Partial
fasting, with little eaten every other day, which has also been
investigated, is designed to trigger the same kind of survival
reactions as full fasting.

Evidence has built up since the 1930s that rodents, fish, fruit
flies, worms, yeast and monkeys all benefit from fasting. "It is well
established that, by reducing the number of calories required for
weight maintenance to 60 to 70 per cent of normal, lifespan is
increased up to 40 per cent, with near-perfect health across a broad
range of species,'' says Dr James Johnson of Louisiana State University.

So there you have it. You can lose weight in a very natural way;
following the lead of rodents, fish, worms, monkeys, and David Blaine.

Of course this doesn't mean you should do whatever the animals or Mr. Blaine do.

Rodents eat their young (when not fasting, apparently); fish can't
close their eyes; worms split in half and regenerate when they're not
eating dirt (and doesn't it make fasting easier when the alternative is
dirt?); monkeys fling their waste at folks who travel far to see them
in their natural-looking cages; and Mr. Blaine didn't really fast.

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