Houdini Museum Featured on Canadian Travel Channel Friday

woman_with_camera_smiling.jpgFrom our very short and limited involvement with television network production (Court TV covered most of our first trial) we know there is an economic and strategic bias against covering stories unless they are in one of the top three television markets. 

 It is tough to blame the network producer.  They need to bring the project in under budget. A story from Chicago, New York, or Los Angeles is easier and less expensive to produce than one from, say, Scranton, Pennsylvania.  

So, given the choice between two comparable stories, the twenty-something producer will cover his or her bacon by shooting the story in the major media market.  

This economic bias is exactly why we are impressed with Dorothy Dietrich and Dick Brooks.  Despite the fact that their Houdini Museum is not within a top-three market, their work and the museum are frequently featured in world-wide television coverage.

In support of our theory we offer the news that the Canadian Travel Channel's Magic Road Trip begins this Friday and will feature the duo and their contribution to magic history.  

We were exicited to learn his the production crew recorded some of our favorite Road Trip Destinations.  Canadian viewers will have a chance to see some very special footage of Lance Burton "[his]act is so enchanting he was signed to the longest-term entertainment contract in history," as well as Quinlan's Inside Magic's favorite The Houdini Museum in the Poconos.  

US viewers may have previously seen portions of the program when it ran on The Travel Channel.

We were impressed by the show's coverage of The Houdini Museum. Clearly the producers found Dorothy Dietrich and Johnny Bravo's work and performance worthy of highlighting.  We couldn't agree more — so we won't even try.

The following episode will feature Penn and Teller, former Michigan magician Franz Harary, a magic show in Manhattan and a visit to the Magic Circle of London.

We look forward to hearing our Canadian friends' review of the episodes.

  

woman_with_camera_smiling.jpgFrom
our very short and limited involvement with television network
production (Court TV covered most of our first trial) we know there is
an economic and strategic bias against covering stories unless they are
in one of the top three television markets. 

 It is tough to
blame the network producer.  They need to bring the project in under
budget. A story from Chicago, New York, or Los Angeles is easier and
less expensive to produce than one from, say, Scranton, Pennsylvania.  

So,
given the choice between two comparable stories, the twenty-something
producer will cover his or her bacon by shooting the story in the major
media market.  

This economic bias is exactly why we are
impressed with Dorothy Dietrich and Dick Brooks.  Despite the fact that
their Houdini Museum is not within a top-three market, their work and
the museum are frequently featured in world-wide television coverage.

In support of our theory we offer the news that the Canadian Travel Channel's Magic Road Trip begins this Friday and will feature the duo and their contribution to magic history.  

We
were exicited to learn his the production crew recorded some of our
favorite Road Trip Destinations.  Canadian viewers will have a chance
to see some very special footage of Lance Burton "[his]act is so
enchanting he was signed to the longest-term entertainment contract in
history," as well as Quinlan's Inside Magic's favorite The Houdini
Museum in the Poconos.  

US viewers may have previously seen portions of the program when it ran on The Travel Channel.

We
were impressed by the show's coverage of The Houdini Museum. Clearly
the producers found Dorothy Dietrich and Johnny Bravo's work and
performance worthy of highlighting.  We couldn't agree more — so we
won't even try.

The following episode will feature Penn and
Teller, former Michigan magician Franz Harary, a magic show in
Manhattan and a visit to the Magic Circle of London.

We look forward to hearing our Canadian friends' review of the episodes.

  

Houdini Museum Featured on Canadian Travel Channel Friday

woman_with_camera_smiling.jpgFrom our very short and limited involvement with television network production (Court TV covered most of our first trial) we know there is an economic and strategic bias against covering stories unless they are in one of the top three television markets. 

 It is tough to blame the network producer.  They need to bring the project in under budget. A story from Chicago, New York, or Los Angeles is easier and less expensive to produce than one from, say, Scranton, Pennsylvania.  

So, given the choice between two comparable stories, the twenty-something producer will cover his or her bacon by shooting the story in the major media market.  

This economic bias is exactly why we are impressed with Dorothy Dietrich and Dick Brooks.  Despite the fact that their Houdini Museum is not within a top-three market, their work and the museum are frequently featured in world-wide television coverage.

In support of our theory we offer the news that the Canadian Travel Channel's Magic Road Trip begins this Friday and will feature the duo and their contribution to magic history.  

We were exicited to learn his the production crew recorded some of our favorite Road Trip Destinations.  Canadian viewers will have a chance to see some very special footage of Lance Burton "[his]act is so enchanting he was signed to the longest-term entertainment contract in history," as well as Quinlan's Inside Magic's favorite The Houdini Museum in the Poconos.  

US viewers may have previously seen portions of the program when it ran on The Travel Channel.

We were impressed by the show's coverage of The Houdini Museum. Clearly the producers found Dorothy Dietrich and Johnny Bravo's work and performance worthy of highlighting.  We couldn't agree more — so we won't even try.

The following episode will feature Penn and Teller, former Michigan magician Franz Harary, a magic show in Manhattan and a visit to the Magic Circle of London.

We look forward to hearing our Canadian friends' review of the episodes.

  

woman_with_camera_smiling.jpgFrom
our very short and limited involvement with television network
production (Court TV covered most of our first trial) we know there is
an economic and strategic bias against covering stories unless they are
in one of the top three television markets. 

 It is tough to
blame the network producer.  They need to bring the project in under
budget. A story from Chicago, New York, or Los Angeles is easier and
less expensive to produce than one from, say, Scranton, Pennsylvania.  

So,
given the choice between two comparable stories, the twenty-something
producer will cover his or her bacon by shooting the story in the major
media market.  

This economic bias is exactly why we are
impressed with Dorothy Dietrich and Dick Brooks.  Despite the fact that
their Houdini Museum is not within a top-three market, their work and
the museum are frequently featured in world-wide television coverage.

In support of our theory we offer the news that the Canadian Travel Channel's Magic Road Trip begins this Friday and will feature the duo and their contribution to magic history.  

We
were exicited to learn his the production crew recorded some of our
favorite Road Trip Destinations.  Canadian viewers will have a chance
to see some very special footage of Lance Burton "[his]act is so
enchanting he was signed to the longest-term entertainment contract in
history," as well as Quinlan's Inside Magic's favorite The Houdini
Museum in the Poconos.  

US viewers may have previously seen portions of the program when it ran on The Travel Channel.

We
were impressed by the show's coverage of The Houdini Museum. Clearly
the producers found Dorothy Dietrich and Johnny Bravo's work and
performance worthy of highlighting.  We couldn't agree more — so we
won't even try.

The following episode will feature Penn and
Teller, former Michigan magician Franz Harary, a magic show in
Manhattan and a visit to the Magic Circle of London.

We look forward to hearing our Canadian friends' review of the episodes.