Wonderful Magic for Sale – The Chop Cup Era

Inside Magic Image of Innovative BunnyWe are like Magic Archaeologists.

We noticed several phases or times in our career, marked by the tools we used (or hoped to use) in our various acts across the decades.  We have unearthed and will soon be selling wonderful pieces found during our excavation of what scientists have termed the Chop Cup age.

The Chop Cup Age lasted over several years and is found just before our Gimmicked Coin eon and just after our Card College era.  All of these time periods are decades from one of our first temporal settings, The Cane Years.  The Cane Years had canes that vanished, appeared, changed color, lit on fire and danced.  They led to the subsequent period in which canes gave way to candles that also appeared, vanished, changed color but never danced.

We will have links to the eBay sale of some Rings and Things cups, a fine brass Benson Bowl (not technically a Chop Cup but still within the realm) and a wonderful China (as in Chinaware, not the country) Chop Cup using a wooden ball that makes a wonderful “ting” sound when the ball appears under the cup.

They are all beautiful pieces and, sadly, not extensively used.  We even have a load ball for the Chop Cup that fits like a wonderful knitted surprise.

Also, although not technically (or in any way, really) a Chop Cup, we have a set of Brass Three Shells and a set of Perfect Peas that will be offered for sale at the same time.  The set is from The School for Scoundrels and comes with a nice velvet bag and perfectly fitting chop cup.

Thank you in advance for sharing in our bountiful excavation of our magical past.

We’re Selling our Lassen Expanded Set

Inside Magic Image of First Illustration from T. Nelson Downs' Modern Coin Manipulation - Now Available at Inside MagicOur loss will be someone’s gain.  We have put up our beautifully hand-crafted Todd Lassen Expanded Morgan set.  Made from uncirculated 1921 Morgan Silver Dollars, the set cost us more than $400 but is now available on ebay with a Buy It Now Price of $375.00 and a starting price of just $50.00.  Such a deal.  Such a wonderful set for the professional coin magician.

Check out the auction here.

Ebay Bans Sale of Magic Spells and Potions

Image of Inside Magic's Potion Test KitchenEbay’s 2012 Fall Seller Update prohibits listings for “conjuring” and “magic” on the online auction site.

Our advanced powers of logic allow us to conclude that since the “update” changed the former policy, prior to the latest update, eBay did permit the selling of “conjuring” and “magic.”

Ebay informed all readers the “following items are also being added to the prohibited items list: advice; spells; curses; hexing; conjuring; magic; prayers; blessing services; magic potions; healing sessions; work from home businesses & information; wholesale lists, and drop shop lists.”

That fits with the rules of statutory construction we learned during our seven years of study at The University of Grenada College of Law — one of the very few “practically accredited” off-shore, correspondence programs for the study of US law.

When interpreting a statute or rule, we follow the Latin canon noscitur a sociis (words are to be “known by their companions”). Ali v. Federal Bureau of Prisons, 552 U. S.  (2008)  Washington State Dept. of Social and Health Servs. v. Guardianship Estate of Keffeler, 537 U. S. 371, 384 (2003) (quoting Gutierrez v. Ada, 528 U. S. 250, 254 (2000).

The canon does not really help in this case, however.

Ebay has not identified a broad group of prohibited goods and then specified certain goods as examples.  But by reading “conjuring” and “magic” with the other words in the sentence  — “advice; spells; curses; hexing; conjuring; magic; prayers; blessing services; magic potions; healing sessions; work from home businesses & information; wholesale lists, and drop shop lists” — we should see a clearly defined set of goods or services prohibited.

We should, but we do not.

“Conjuring” is a verb by anyone’s definition.  “Magic” on the other hoof, is rarely used as a verb and, even then, only used incorrectly.  “I magic,” “you magic,” or “he/she/it magics” is not found in most verb conjugation texts because it is not a verb.   How ironic is it that the word “verb” is actually a noun?

“Hexing” is the gerund for the verb “hex” and would imply that one is issuing a “curse” or casting a “spell.”

And while we are at it, what is a “drop shop list”?  Is this a typographical error where the author meant to write “drop ship list” or “drip hips slips”?

We try to read meaning into everything with writing.  We have no friends.  We read ticket stubs, 31-page terms of service agreements ignored by those who click “I Agree” on the first page, warning stickers partially hidden by electrified fencing around our backyard, Ouija Board informational brochures detailing the minimal but still statistically significant chance a user will have his or her soul snatched in the course of play, and listing prohibition updates issued by on-line auction sites.

It could be eBay just wanted to write the prohibition to avoid being accused of permitting the sale of “hexes” or “curses” or “drop shop lists.”  That would explain the sloppy structure and possibly bad spelling. Their official blog claimed they wanted to ban the sale of intangible goods.

They wanted to stop the listings for “things that people won’t be able to use or be able to confirm whether they’ve received the items.”

For example, “Items where the value is placed on an intangible factor. For example, listings that offer someone’s ‘soul’ or a container that claims to have someone’s ‘soul’ are not allowed.”

We presume — because we have sold “magic tricks” since this new rule issued — that magic of the type we practice can still be listed.  In fact, we are betting witches and necromancers could continue offering their wares if couched in language that seems less like the occult and more like something you would find at the novelty and trick shop.

Petitions and letters of support came from psychics, palm readers, witches, healers, hex makers, curse creators and those who love them.


Continue reading Ebay Bans Sale of Magic Spells and Potions

Schoolcraft Quarter Flipper at eBay

Another plug for an eBay sale.  We wonder how this qualifies as news?

Check out the newly reduced price for the Buy It Now Option on eBay now! (http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=190447534042)

The Flipper Quarter is Sold Out on the Schoolcraft Store.  If you want one, this may be your best chance.

If you are not a Magician — you likely do not know what a flipper coin is or why one would want it.  If you are a Magician — you know exactly what a flipper coin is, why you would want it, and how disappointing most coins are.

PLEASE NOTE: The image of the two coins overlapped is the gimmicked set but the set we are selling is a 1999 Connecticut with the tree (Nutmeg?) on the back.

I have uploaded a picture of the reverse of the actual coin just now.
If you are a Magician who works around real people in real settings, you have probably always wanted a flipper quarter.  The gimmick usually comes as a half-dollar or dollar coin.  This is because the technology into making the weight and force work is too far advanced for mere mortal gimmicked coin manufacturers.
You can not "grind out" a quarter version of the flipper coin.  It probably could not be automated.  The task takes time and patience to make it look perfect — suitable for audiences within arms' length — but also work perfect and perfectly every time. 

The Schoolcraft Flipper is an extremely well-made gimmicked coin that can allow a magician to perform pretty amazing effects with little or no sleight of hand.  We are not going to give the secret away.  Besides, if you are a magician, you already know.
The Schoolcraft Flipper coin differs from traditional Flipper coins in three ways:

1. The coin opens via gravity. This means no shaking.  Pick it up and use it.  And once it closes, it stays closed as you continue with your effect.
2. When open, the coin can lay flat on your hands or on a table surface. This means, you can pick it up, and set it back down in the open position without any bizarre hand moves. 
3. There is no visible rubber band — it is internal. An internal rubber band means the gaff can withstand reasonable scrutiny from the side.

The Schoolcraft Flipper coin has been sold to many inventive magicians in the last two years.
This is a great opportunity to purchase a brand new gaff at a great price.

We are not worthy: Schoolcraft 3CF for Sale

The Author with His 3CF from Schoolcraft CoinsWe put up our Schoolcraft 3CF for sale on eBay.  We are not worthy.

Here is the ad for Jamie Schoolcraft’s 3CF coin set:

The 3CF is an original Schoolcraft creation.   The 3CF is everything the 3CM is and more!  This gimmick is basically an all-in-one gaff.  The outer most shell is expanded, so you can use it with regular coins. 

The middle shell is Deans Set sized, so it will work with the Deans Sets.  And lastly the magnetic insert coin is also a magnetic flipper.  Giving you four coins that will all go into one.  The magnetics are perfectly balanced just like the 3CM gimmick, and the entire unit is lined with industrial grade Teflon. 

There are several artists currently working on routines for this new unique gaff.  There are some exciting additions to this gaff also coming in the near future. The 3CF is a 3CM, Magnetic Flipper Coin, Shimmed Shell/Magnetic Flipper Combo, and an Expanded shell all rolled into one compact gaff.  Giving you endless routine possibilities!!

How great are Jamie Schoolcraft’s coin sets?  They are so great that we do not deserve them.  We have skills and we can handle much of what is taught in Bobo’s Coin Magic but there is little chance you’ll see our coin routine in Vegas – unless it is in a contest at one of the many conventions.  And we do believe anyone performing close-up should use the best props available and necessary to achieve the intended effect.  So, by our logic, we should keep the coin set.  Unfortunately, logic doesn’t thrive in our skull; it is drowned by floods of emotion and scorched by the searing sun of self-doubt. 

Is the Schoolcraft 3CF the finest piece of equipment we have ever owned?  Yes.  Do we deserve it? No.

A reasonable person might ask, why or how would a person “deserve” one trick or another?

We have no retort.  It is not a matter of price – although the set is not inexpensive – or even its relative rarity.  The question is only whether we deserve to have a set made with such precision, such skill? 

We have come close to listing the Schoolcraft 3CF on eBay several times but hesitated before clicking the final button.  We bent over the coin set, stroking it slowly and intoning Gollum’s “precious, precious.”

If you are interested and deserving of such a fine effect made by the master craftsman, you can check out our listing on eBay.  If you believe yourself undeserving of such an item, you can join us at the group therapy session on Tuesdays in conference room C-1 at the community center.

Here is the eBay link if you have it in you.  http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=190447069439