Scott Mills: Going Big Time from Small Town

Making It Big Time!

The Brandon Sun (Canada) profiles 15-year-old Scott Mills from Wawota, Saskatoon. 

The article begins with a truism, especially in these days of political correctness and safe child-handling skills:

Most parents would discourage their son from putting his
younger brother in a box and shoving swords through it ? but not Scott
Mills? mom and dad.

The reporter notes his father assisted in the building of the
illusion (we hope it’s an illusion — the article didn’t say. If it is
not an illusion but in fact a horrible torture device used to injure or
intimidate Mr. Mills’ younger brother, please disregard our witty
intro).

Oh, wait, the next sentence says the box is an illusion built for Mr. Mills’ finale. Phewf!

We don’t know the Mills’ family and we’re not saying they would
develop a torture device with their elder son to use on his little
brother — we just didn’t know. We read an article on the web at badfamilyfun.com
about a Canadian family who made bad devices with their kids. True,
those devices were used to torture animals and insects but it is tough
to know when one’s witty injection will lead to a further devolution of
society by apparently condoning evil doings.

Our court-appointed counselor suggested we stop writing down
everything we think as we review the stories for the Inside Magic Daily
News. But the voice that sounds like that talking/singing candle in the
road-show version of Beauty and the Beast, keeps telling us to write it
down. The voice said, “Mon ami, why would you listen to a court-appointed counselor? Sacre bleu!
If she was any good, she would have her own practice and not work for a
mere pittance to prove someone is competent to stand trial. Ignore her,
Mon fr?re.”

Back to the story. Yes.

Mr. Mills has been studying magic for over two years. He considers
himself a semi-professional magician.
The article traces his growth from attending his first live magic show
to building his own illusions. He elected to learn from the internet.
(See, Mr. Dooley was right about the use of the internet to attract
kids into magic).

“Off the Internet I learned a lot,” Mr. Mills said. “Like, a lot of
little tricks that everybody can learn. So eventually I started showing
my parents and my family and they thought I was pretty good at it so
they allowed me to buy bigger tricks.”

So where does a young man from Saskatoon buy magic? The internet as
well. His mother is pleased he is working to pay for the props he
purchases from online auction sites.

Then, another truism from mom: “I think it?s a good thing to waste your money on instead of booze and drugs.”

Mr. Mills next show will be at the personal care home in Reston. He
travels between eastern Saskatchewan and western Manitoba to perform in
dinner theaters, town halls, and virtually any venue. The young man
charges between $20.00 and $100.00 CDN per show but his mom claims it
is his love to be on stage that motivates…

Making It Big Time!

The Brandon Sun (Canada) profiles 15-year-old Scott Mills from Wawota, Saskatoon. 

The article begins with a truism, especially in these days of political correctness and safe child-handling skills:

Most parents would discourage their son from putting his
younger brother in a box and shoving swords through it ? but not Scott
Mills? mom and dad.

The reporter notes his father assisted in the building of the
illusion (we hope it’s an illusion — the article didn’t say. If it is
not an illusion but in fact a horrible torture device used to injure or
intimidate Mr. Mills’ younger brother, please disregard our witty
intro).

Oh, wait, the next sentence says the box is an illusion built for Mr. Mills’ finale. Phewf!

We don’t know the Mills’ family and we’re not saying they would
develop a torture device with their elder son to use on his little
brother — we just didn’t know. We read an article on the web at badfamilyfun.com
about a Canadian family who made bad devices with their kids. True,
those devices were used to torture animals and insects but it is tough
to know when one’s witty injection will lead to a further devolution of
society by apparently condoning evil doings.

Our court-appointed counselor suggested we stop writing down
everything we think as we review the stories for the Inside Magic Daily
News. But the voice that sounds like that talking/singing candle in the
road-show version of Beauty and the Beast, keeps telling us to write it
down. The voice said, “Mon ami, why would you listen to a court-appointed counselor? Sacre bleu!
If she was any good, she would have her own practice and not work for a
mere pittance to prove someone is competent to stand trial. Ignore her,
Mon fr?re.”

Back to the story. Yes.

Mr. Mills has been studying magic for over two years. He considers
himself a semi-professional magician.
The article traces his growth from attending his first live magic show
to building his own illusions. He elected to learn from the internet.
(See, Mr. Dooley was right about the use of the internet to attract
kids into magic).

“Off the Internet I learned a lot,” Mr. Mills said. “Like, a lot of
little tricks that everybody can learn. So eventually I started showing
my parents and my family and they thought I was pretty good at it so
they allowed me to buy bigger tricks.”

So where does a young man from Saskatoon buy magic? The internet as
well. His mother is pleased he is working to pay for the props he
purchases from online auction sites.

Then, another truism from mom: “I think it?s a good thing to waste your money on instead of booze and drugs.”

Mr. Mills next show will be at the personal care home in Reston. He
travels between eastern Saskatchewan and western Manitoba to perform in
dinner theaters, town halls, and virtually any venue. The young man
charges between $20.00 and $100.00 CDN per show but his mom claims it
is his love to be on stage that motivates him.

Is it tough to work out of a very small town in the middle of a very rural area?

Wawota, after all, has a population 538. Mr. Mills believes it has helped his career.

“Everybody loves me ’cause I’m just a local kid, right? You know small towns and stuff ? everybody knows about me.”

His plan is to continue his study and practice with the aim of
making it as a professional magician. “A lot of people have said it’s
really hard to make a career in magic, but if I can, it’s something I’d
really like to do. I could keep doing this for the rest of my life and
see how far it takes me.”

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